National Trust welcomes Lake District nomination to World Heritage Status

Culture Minister Ed Vaizey announced earlier today that the Lake District will be bidding for World Heritage Site status in 2016. 

The National Trust has been caring for this iconic landscapes for over 100 years, nurturing both the natural environment and its cultural heritage.  Continue reading

Stonehenge transformed by new visitor centre

The long-awaited Stonehenge exhibition and visitor centre will open on 18 December.

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The new Stonehenge exhibition and visitor centre, a sensitively designed modern building, is located 1.5 miles away from Stonehenge and designed by leading practice Denton Corker Marshall.

For the first time, visitors will have a proper introduction to one of the world’s most important prehistoric monuments – set within the landscape looked after by the National Trust.

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Giant project up for a ‘Giant’ prize

The new Giant’s Causeway visitor’s centre at Northern Ireland’s only UNESCO World Heritage Site has been shortlisted for the RIBA Stirling Prize, one of the most coveted awards for architectural excellence.

The £18.5 million centre, designed by Heneghan Peng architects based in Dublin opened in July 2012 and is now the gateway to the 40,000 iconic basalt stones.
The centre, which took two years to build, has also been designed to fit seamlessly within the landscape without impacting the view of the coastline from the stones.

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The Lake District – is it really ‘sheep-wrecked’?

Read a response from John Darlington, National Trust’s Director of Region for the North West, to George Monbiot’s article on the Lake District:

“‘Sheep-wrecked’, one of ‘the most depressing landscapes in Europe’ – hardly a ringing endorsement of the Lake District from George Monbiot in Tuesday’s Guardian.  I’m a fan of George: he’s an eloquent and passionate advocate for wildlife, and the National Trust, as owners of 1/5th of the Lakes, would be foolish not to listen to what he has to say. His challenge is that sheep-farming has denuded the environment of the fells, and that our ambition to designate the area as a World Heritage Site will lead to the pickling of this landscape in aspic, and the perpetuating one way of management to the detriment of all others. Continue reading

22,000 people celebrate summer solstice at Stonehenge and Avebury

Over 22,000 people gathered to celebrate the coming of the summer solstice at National Trust Stonehenge Landscape and Avebury on Friday morning. The weather surpassed all expectations to create a beautiful sunset and clear evening, however low cloud came in over night obscuring the sunrise at 4:52 am.

Within the Stonehenge World Heritage Site, the National Trust manages 827 hectares (2,100 acres) of downland surrounding the famous stone circle. The stone circle itself is owned and managed by English Heritage.

Jan Tomlin, General Manager of Stonehenge and Avebury mentioned:

“We celebrate solstice twice a year in this country, both in June and December.

“Our role at Stonehenge is supporting English Heritage who expected something in the region of 30,000 visitors to come across our land.”

“We have a whole team of volunteers to help people get across the land safely and to make sure they have the best evening possible.”

Meet some of the National Trust team making the Stonehenge summer solstice possible this year.

Amend the Planning Bill – news from Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland has stunning special places: the cliffs and beaches of the North Coast, Fermanagh’s lakelands, the Mountains of Mourne, the Sperrins, cities like Belfast and Derry with their fine architecture and the country’s only World Heritage Site – the Giant’s Causeway.

Such places could be under threat from a Planning Bill which is currently going through the Northern Ireland Assembly. Together with other a range of organisations, we are supporting the ‘Amend the Bill’ campaign to call for politicians to make changes to protect some of the country’s most special places for generations to come; and to deliver a better planning system for everyone.

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So far more than 4800 messages of support have been sent to politicians across Northern Ireland.

Heather Thompson, National Trust director for Northern Ireland said: “The Planning Bill contains two clauses which focus on economic development which could result in planning applications which aren’t in the best interests of communities and the environment, being approved. We should all welcome the introduction of a more effective system of planning. However we need one that ensures a fair and balanced approach to economic, environmental and social issues, and supports economic development which takes all three into account.

“The Bill also presents an ideal opportunity to bring in protection for World Heritage Sites and their settings in Northern Ireland, which includes the Giant’s Causeway and the countryside immediately around it.

“With the Bill currently in front of the Northern Assembly, it is vital that people speak up now in order to protect our special places for everyone that enjoys them today as well as future generations.”

The Planning Bill reaches an important milestone when it goes to Consideration Stage on 24 June 2013. At this point it is debated on the floor of the NI Assembly.

You can join the discussion on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/AmendTheBill and follow us on twitter at @AmendTheBill. There is also a campaign blog with more detailed information at http://www.amendthebill.wordpress.com

Residents from outside of Northern Ireland can also register their support by emailing info@amendthebill.org

An online tool has been set up for NI residents at http://www.amendthebill.org.uk (a NI postcode is needed to use this tool)

National Trust bitterly disappointed at court ruling on Giant’s Causeway development

We’ve posted previously on our legal challenge to a decision to grant planing permission for a golf course development in the setting of the Giant’s Causeway World Heritage Site. Today the High Court ruled against our challenge.

A National Trust spokesman said:

“The National Trust is bitterly disappointed by the Court’s ruling and we remain convinced that a massive development in the setting of this World Heritage Site is wrong.

“We still believe that if a development of this scale does go ahead in this location, the message is that nowhere in Northern Ireland, no matter how important or protected, is safe from development.

“The ruling today has served to highlight aspects of very serious concern for those partners involved in the care and protection of the World Heritage Site.

“It is essential that we work together to get planning policy right in Northern Ireland to ensure that appropriate development can happen, but not at the expense of our beautiful landscapes and historic places. 

“There are also significant issues regarding the relationship between Government in Northern Ireland, Great Britain and UNESCO that must be addressed to ensure the protection of our World Heritage Site for the long term.”

ENDS