Wildlife on the Great Orme

Matthew Oates, National Specialist on Nature and Wildlife for the National Trust, shares his love for the Great Orme in North Wales and the wildlife that calls it home.

The Great Orme is a place of pilgrimage for British naturalists.  Try finding a botanist or a butterfly enthusiast who hasn’t been there, or at least one who doesn’t desperately want to visit.  It is also on the birders’ radar, for its increasing Chough population and because it is a place where rare migrants turn up.  Bat, beetle, lichen, moss, moth and marine wildlife enthusiasts also know and love the Great Orme, as do geologists, geographers and archaeologists. In effect, it is a wildlife paradise.

The Great Orme, 12/05/15. Photograph Richard Williams richardwilliamsimages@hotmail.com 07901518159

The Great Orme, Credit National Trust, Richard Williams

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Neptune rises for 50 years of National Trust coast campaign

The iconic White Cliffs of Dover were a perfect natural screening for Neptune, God of the Sea, to rise from the ocean on Tuesday and thank the nation for 50 years of support for the National Trust’s Neptune Coastline Campaign.

Neptune Rises at White Cliffs - credit National Trust

The moment was intended as a way of saying ‘thank you’ to everyone who has supported the campaign’s coastal work over the last five decades, which has been powered by the generosity of hundreds of thousands of supporters to date.

Using multiple cameras on a trigger system, the Neptune animation took a crew of seven technicians two nights to film from the Port of Dover.  Kelly Eagle of Projection Artworks said; ‘This type of stop-motion animation has never been done to this incredible scale. The White Cliffs of Dover provided the added drama and majesty to set the scene.’

The ambitious Neptune Coastline Campaign launched in 1965, when the National Trust looked after almost 202 miles of coast around England, Northern Ireland and Wales. The charity now cares for 775 miles, including 5 UNESCO heritage sites, 9 lighthouses and an overall 10% of the British coastline.

Dame Helen Ghosh, the National Trust’s Director-General, says: Over fifty years the extraordinary generosity and support of people from across the world has enabled the Trust to buy some of the most beautiful, dramatic and diverse coastline on these islands. This campaign has tapped into that deep sense of connection with, and love of the coast.’

People are encouraged to get involved with the National Trust Coast campaign this summer by using #lovethecoast.

This year also sees the National Trust announce a new coastal vision for the future, helping to continue to grow and protect our shorelines for ever, for everyone.

Helen Ghosh continues; ‘Our priorities for the future are to help create opportunities for people to enjoy the coast, protect our wonderful coastal heritage and to enrich the wildlife living on our shores.’

For more information about the National Trust’s work protecting the coast, head to www.nationaltrust.org.uk/neptune

Original Irish Yew creates Sea Monster at Mount Stewart

A new Celtic figure sculpted from yew will welcome visitors to the world famous Mount Stewart gardens on the shores of Strangford Lough in County Down, Northern Ireland.

l-r Neil Porteous, National Trust Head of Gardens and Alan Ryder, Mount Stewart Propagator with the new Formorian. Credit Elaine Hill

l-r Neil Porteous, National Trust Head of Gardens and Alan Ryder, Mount Stewart Propagator with the new Formorian. Credit Elaine Hill

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National Trust to complete largest ever survey of its coastal wildlife

BioBlitz12, Copyright National Trust, credit Steven Haywood

The National Trust are carrying out 25 BioBlitzes of coastal wildlife this summer. Copyright National Trust, credit Steven Haywood

This summer, hundreds of wildlife lovers and nature experts will help the National Trust to carry out its largest ever survey of coastal wildlife as part of the conservation charity’s year-long celebrations of the coast.

24 places along the 775 miles of coastline looked after by the National Trust across England, Wales and Northern Ireland will host a BioBlitz, a race against the clock involving rangers, experts and members of the public to record as many different species as possible.

A 25th BioBlitz will also be held at Kinver Edge in Staffordshire. Although land locked, this beautiful sandstone escarpment was once formed of ancient sand dunes and the survey will help uncover how some coastal wildlife can live away from the sea.

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South American super-nannies welcome new arrivals

Nannies for the new arrival might be on one famous couple’s minds, but nervous mothers in one part of North Wales are resting easier thanks to their two male super-nannies from South America.

An Alpaca to watch over ewe. Credit Wynn Owen

An Alpaca to watch over ewe. Credit Wynn Owen

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Clandon Park fire – items rescued from Speakers’ Parlour

One of Clandon Park’s most important rooms has miraculously survived almost intact after the devastating fire left the 18th century mansion a burnt out shell last week (Wednesday 29 April).

While the building is being assessed for structural damage, only limited access has been granted to the least damaged parts of the house.

Among these is the Speakers’ Parlour, one of the ground floor rooms, which celebrated the three members of the Onslow family who were Speakers for the House of Commons over the centuries.

The Speakers’ Parlour remained almost intact after the fire which has enabled access to the collections that remained inside.

Removing the carpet from the Speakers' Parlour after the fire

Removing the carpet from the Speakers’ Parlour after the fire

Objects now taken to safety include the ornate ormolu chandelier which was part of the decorative scheme from 1801, the large Turkey carpet dating from the 19th century, the decorative polished brass and steel fender from the fireplace and pieces of delicate, gilt etched glassware.

The decorative plaster ceiling in the Speakers’ Parlour, among the most magnificent in the house, has been carefully propped up to protect it, and the chimneypiece, designed by the house’s architect Giacomo Leoni in the 1720s, has also survived.

All the paintings from the room, including the portraits of Arthur Onslow, the Great Speaker, and Richard Onslow, Speaker in the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, were rescued on the day of the fire.

The Speakers' Parlour at Clandon Park, Surrey.

The Speakers’ Parlour before the fire, photo: National Trust Images/Nadia Mackenzie

 

Jim Foy who is managing the salvage operation at Clandon comments: “It is heartening that we have been able to rescue more of the important items inside the house and we hope that there will be more good news as the salvage operation continues.

 “We are still limited in terms of access while structural engineers assess the building. The weather is also a big factor as we wait to see how the building responds to conditions like the high winds we have had over the past couple of days. We are incredibly grateful for the continued support we are receiving from volunteers, external specialists, the fire service and many others.”

An investigation is underway to identify the cause of the fire.

It is too early to say what the longer term plans will be for Clandon Park but donations raised will help it to face its uncertain future. To make a donation please call 0344 800 1895 or donate online at www.nationaltrust.org.uk/donate

Clandon Park fire – update

The National Trust today revealed a significant amount of the collection had been saved from the Clandon Park fire during the salvage operation.

Crews from Surrey Fire Brigade were continuing to dampen down the stately home, following the blaze which ripped through the 18th century stately home, near Guildford, Surrey, on Wednesday afternoon.

The house has been left a burnt out shell by the blaze and a cordon remains in place around the site.

Staff are now assessing what they have been able to save and determining what has been lost.

Among the items that have been saved are:

Speaker Arthur Onslow calling upon Sir Robert Walpole to speak in the House of Commons by Sir James Thornhill (Melcombe Regis 1675 - Stalbridge 1734) and William Hogarth (London 1697 - London 1764)

Painting depicting Speaker Arthur Onslow calling upon Sir Robert Walpole to speak in the House of Commons ©National Trust Images/John Hammond

  • Painting depicting Speaker Arthur Onslow calling upon Sir Robert Walpole to speak in the House of Commons, by Sir James Thornhill  and William Hogarth 1730, from the Library
  • Board listing the rules to be observed in the servants’ hall at Clandon, eighteenth century.
  • Painting of an ostrich in a classical landscape, oil on canvas, by Francis Barlow (c.1626–1704), probably painted in the 1670s, from the Marble Hall.
  • Bible printed by John Basket in 1716-1717, from the Library
  • Folding screen incorporating Victorian and Edwardian Onslow family photographs, from the Library
  • A pair of giltwood side tables in the manner of John Gumley and James Moore, made in about 1725, from the State Bedroom
  • Silver, including some pieces by the noted silversmith Paul Storr, from the Speaker’s Parlour
  • The hangings of the Clandon state bed, made in about 1710. The hangings had just returned to Clandon following conservation treatment and were still packed up.
  • Set of hall chairs with the Onslow crest, from the Marble Hall at Clandon

 

Until a full assessment is done it will not be possible to confirm objects that did not survive.

The Trust’s Director General, Helen Ghosh said: “Although the house was pretty well burned out, the operation rescued a significant amount of the collection, and we are hopeful there will be more to recover when our specialists are able to get inside the building and start the painstaking archaeological salvage work. But there is a lot that we will never recover.

“The immediate sense of shock and loss amongst staff working at the property has quickly been replaced by a steely determination. The team at Clandon, staff from other properties and local volunteers – have responded with tremendous fortitude, calmness and professionalism to the event.

“When the overall impact of the fire is clearer, we will be able to decide on the longer term future of the house.

“I’d like to again thank the magnificent job the Surrey Fire Brigade. Their team-work and professionalism has been awe-inspiring.

“We’ve also been very touched by the offers of support, concern and good will from all over the country – we appreciate those messages.”

We cannot say at this stage what the future holds but donations raised will help Clandon Park face its uncertain future. To make a donation please call 0344 800 1895.