In Pictures: storm damage to trees at National Trust places

The winter storms have led to some dramatic losses of trees at National Trust places. Here is a selection of pictures showing how they have affected our estates and countryside. Our teams on the ground have been working hard to keep access open, removing some of the timber for use at the properties and creating new homes for nature in the fallen trees.

The ranger team working at Lyme Park in Cheshire to clear a footpath after a fallen tree had blocked it

The ranger team working at Lyme Park in Cheshire to clear a footpath after a fallen tree had blocked it

Trees lost on the southern end of Brownsea Island as a result of the south-easterly winds

Trees lost on the southern end of Brownsea Island as a result of the south-easterly winds

A split Oak tree at Charlecote Park in Warwickshire

A split Oak tree at Charlecote Park in Warwickshire

An old Lime tree at Trelissick in south Cornwall blown over by the storms.  The timber will be used for carvings and to create a new habitat for insects and fungi.

An old Lime tree at Trelissick in south Cornwall blown over by the storms. The timber will be used for carvings and to create a new habitat for insects and fungi.

A split tree at Tatton Park which has lost thirty trees this winter.  The team cleared many of them within 24 hours.

A split tree at Tatton Park which has lost thirty trees this winter. The team cleared many of them within 24 hours.

A 500 year old oak tree at Kedleston in Derbyshire which will become an ideal home for wildlife

A 500 year old oak tree at Kedleston in Derbyshire which will become an ideal home for wildlife

For more information about how the winter storms and extreme weather have impacted upon National Trust places you can follow the hashtags #NTnature and #NTcoast on twitter

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3 thoughts on “In Pictures: storm damage to trees at National Trust places

  1. Just a question, can’t some trees just be left in place? Health and safety laws aside, a quick inscription along the lines of “died in the great gales of February 2014” would be very apt in certain cases.

    • Hi Tony

      Thanks for your comments.

      Some of the trees are left where they fall to create new homes for nature. Some trees have to be removed, for access reasons for example, and when this happens we use the wood on the estate where we can.

      National Trust Press Office

      • Thanks, I think that must be the best approach, as where at all possible, it ought to be left alone. Especially when you think woodland bird populations are in part suffering due to our overzealous clearance, just to make things look tidy. So often in nature, one activity affecting those critters at the bottom of the food-chain effect those much higher up in such a disastrous manner. Careful management and thought process can put an end to this destruction more often than not. Many Thanks for taking time to respond.

        Best Wishes

        Tony

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