National Trust statement: Car parking at our countryside and coastal locations

Our 4.7 million members continue to park for free.  Non-members have been charged to park at many of our countryside and coastal locations for some time. 

 

Over the past two years we have been gradually introducing pay and display machines at car parks with over 25 spaces, replacing the ‘person in a hut’ and donation box models.

 

The money we raise helps us look after the coast, countryside and footpaths that we would otherwise not be able to do.

 

Special arrangements have been made at Levant for the descendants of people killed in the mine disaster to park for free.

 

Funds raised from car parking will be used to maintain and improve car park facilities, help with footpath repairs, marking out new pathways to improve access and further aid visitor enjoyment and funding conservation projects to encourage wildlife. 

 

Charges will vary depending on location and the average car park fee will be £1 an hour and up to £5 for a whole day. 

 

We want people to visit and enjoy the special places in our care and we need to get the basics right in terms of providing good facilities while balancing this with caring for the surrounding countryside and wildlife, and in the face of rising conservation costs. 

 

As Britain’s largest conservation charity, the National Trust cares for over 250,000 hectares of countryside and 775 miles of coastline around England, Wales and Northern Ireland.  Over 200 million visits are made every year to our countryside and coastline putting increasing pressure on the landscape and facilities. 

Membership price rise will help fund record conservation spend and deliver better experiences for visitors

  • Average rise of 15p a month to help fund record conservation investment
  • Charity responds to feedback with improved facilities, longer opening times and more visitor programmes
  • Over one million members pay discounted rate
  • Members benefit from unlimited access to 500 places and free parking

Annual membership of the National Trust will increase from March 1, 2017, by an average of £1.80 a year to help the charity fund record levels of investment in vital conservation work, and improve visitor facilities and experiences.

Money raised from memberships is vital not only to help the Trust care for 300 historic properties, 775 miles of coastline and 250,000 hectares of countryside across England, Wales and Northern Ireland, but also provide access to them for ever for everyone.

People walking, with Worms Head in the distance, Gower, Wales.

People walking, with Worms Head in the distance, Gower, Wales.

The Trust, which is largely funded through donations, memberships and legacies, spent a record £107m on conservation last year in maintaining, repairing and improving its houses, countryside and tenanted properties.

It also plans to spend an extra £300 million on addressing a backlog of conservation work by 2024.

The Trust said the extra funding would help it respond to what its members wanted including keeping its doors open for longer and at times which suit visitors. More properties than ever are now open for 363 days a year.

Members also benefit from free car parking at more than 170 additional countryside and coastal locations.

Members have also asked for increased numbers of events and more inspiring experiences along with better website and digital communications to keep them informed of what’s happening at Trust places.

In response, the charity is investing more money into visitor programmes and digital platforms, along with better parking, larger cafes and a greater range of activities at many sites.

Extra staff members have meanwhile been employed on the ground in the last twelve months to improve visitor experiences.

Visitors exploring the house at Lyme Park, Cheshire.

Visitors exploring the house at Lyme Park, Cheshire. Credit National Trust Image/John Millar

Individual adults will pay only £1.80 more for membership while Family membership increases by £3.60 a year.

The smallest increase in membership is for the Senior discounted category at an extra £1.10 for the year, rising from £47.50 to £48.60.

The Trust is continuing this discounted rate for Senior members who have held either an individual or joint membership for at least five of the last ten years, and is also continuing its Young Person’s concession for ages 13 – 25.

Currently, over one million members have taken up the discounted rate, which is the equivalent of one in five members.

Jackie Jordan, the Trust’s Director of Brand, Marketing and Supporter Development says:

“Our members’ support is absolutely vital to everything we do as a charity. The income from memberships helps us to look after the houses, coastlines, and countryside in our care on behalf of the nation.

“On average memberships will go up by around 15p a month and that will help us to plough money back into our biggest ever programme of conservation work, along with improving our facilities and visitor programmes.

“We’re responding to what our members tell us they want which will increase their enjoyment of our places. That’s why we’re opening more of our properties for longer and at times which better suit visitors, with many now open 363 days a year.

“We are investing in larger cafes and new shops, along with better car parking facilities and toilets, improved visitor reception areas, and more gallery spaces, events and outdoor activities.

“We couldn’t do all that we need to do without the support of our members and we want to thank them all for their continued support.

“We believe we offer great value for money. For around a fiver a month, a member can enjoy unlimited access to hundreds of Trust locations across England, Wales and Northern Ireland, whilst helping to look after them for future generations to enjoy.”

See here for more information on National Trust membership

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National Trust ‘secrets’ unveiled in new Channel 5 series

Filming at Lyme Park for a six part TV series about National trust

Filming at Lyme Park for a six part TV series about the National Trust. Credit National Trust images.

The National Trust has opened its doors to Channel 5 for a new series starting on Tuesday 07 February at 9pm, which will celebrate the stunning estates, historic houses and miles of breathtaking countryside and coastline in the conservation charity’s care.

Across six, 60 minute episodes, host Alan Titchmarsh will find out about the Trust’s conservation work and discover the stories hidden behind its buildings and gardens in the new series, Secrets of the National Trust with Alan Titchmarsh.

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New exhibition celebrates Turner and the Age of British Watercolour

Petworth, west Sussex 7 January – 12 March 2017

The house and upper pond at Petworth House and Park, West Sussex. The deer park at Petworth was landscaped by 'Capability' Brown.

The house and upper pond at Petworth House and Park, West Sussex. Credit National Trust Images, Andrew Butler.

Some of Britain’s greatest watercolours will come to the National Trust’s Petworth in West Sussex for an exhibition that explores JMW Turner’s leading role in shaping this uniquely British art form.

The exhibition will display watercolours by Turner himself alongside stunning works by artists who inspired him including Edward Dayes and Thomas Hearne, contemporaries John Constable, John Sell Cotman, Thomas Girtin and many others.

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One year on: Storm Desmond and the Lake District

One year on from Storm Desmond, National Trust rangers in the Lake District are still fixing the damaged caused by floods that left the charity with facing a million pound clean-up bill – including £600,000 worth of uninsured damage.

view-from-latrigg-2016-no3-j-malley

View from Latrigg 2016. Credit John Malley

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PICTURES: Restoring Stonehenge’s chalk grassland in world heritage site’s 30th year

As Stonehenge celebrates 30 years as a World Heritage Site, National Trust rangers and volunteers in Wiltshire are working closely with farmers to restore the chalk grassland landscape that would have been familiar to the monument’s original builders.

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National Trust – Farming in the Lakes

Mike Innerdale, Assistant Director of Operations in the North, said:

The majority of our farms in the Lakes are leased on multi-generational or life-time tenancies (51 out of 91) under specific legislation. The rest of our tenancies are offered for an average minimum length of 15-years, which is three times longer than the national average and goes well beyond the 10-year minimum the Tenants’ Farmers Association has been calling for across the industry.

We want to maintain and  build strong, long-term relationships with our farm tenants in the Lakes: they need to know we’re committed to them and supporting them –  so that they have the confidence to invest in their business.  We will be writing to all our tenants in the Lakes to reassure them of our long-term commitment to hill farming and hill  farmers. We are also discussing with farming representatives about how we make the tenancy renewal process as fair, transparent and open as possible. We want long-term tenants and there’s no reason why tenancies wouldn’t be renewed if both parties are happy.

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