National Trust – Farming in the Lakes

Mike Innerdale, Assistant Director of Operations in the North, said:

The majority of our farms in the Lakes are leased on multi-generational or life-time tenancies (51 out of 91) under specific legislation. The rest of our tenancies are offered for an average minimum length of 15-years, which is three times longer than the national average and goes well beyond the 10-year minimum the Tenants’ Farmers Association has been calling for across the industry.

We want to maintain and  build strong, long-term relationships with our farm tenants in the Lakes: they need to know we’re committed to them and supporting them –  so that they have the confidence to invest in their business.  We will be writing to all our tenants in the Lakes to reassure them of our long-term commitment to hill farming and hill  farmers. We are also discussing with farming representatives about how we make the tenancy renewal process as fair, transparent and open as possible. We want long-term tenants and there’s no reason why tenancies wouldn’t be renewed if both parties are happy.

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Heritage Lottery Fund award boosts National Trust appeal to secure Churchill’s legacy at Chartwell

The Heritage Lottery Fund (HLF) has awarded a grant of £3.45 million towards the National Trust’s appeal to reinvigorate Winston Churchill’s legacy and acquire many of his personal objects at his family home Chartwell in Kent.

The south front of Chartwell, the home of Sir Winston Churchill between 1922 and 1964, Kent.

The south front of Chartwell, the home of Sir Winston Churchill between 1922 and 1964, Kent.

The conservation charity launched its ‘Churchill’s Chartwell’ appeal in September to raise £7.1 million.

Since then, nearly £2 million has been raised from around the world from members, supporters, charitable trusts and the Royal Oak Foundation – the Trust’s membership affiliate in the US.

The HLF grant brings the total raised so far to nearly £5.5 million and the National Trust is hoping that more supporters will come forward to help reach the appeal target.

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Ground breaking technology reveals location of monks’ cemetery and new evidence of their burial rituals at Fountains Abbey in Yorkshire

Remarkable ground-penetrating technology has revealed more than 500 graves of Cistercian monks and lay brothers who once lived at Fountains Abbey in Yorkshire, now cared for by the National Trust.

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Fountains Abbey. Credit National Trust Images/Andrew Butler.

The abbey at the site existed from the early 12th century to its closure in 1539 during the Dissolution of the Monasteries.

The conservation charity has been working for over two years on a project with experts from the University of Bradford, Geoscan Research, and Mala Geoscience to research the largest monastic ruins in the country.  Continue reading

Trust digs deep to stem sector’s skills shortage in heritage horticulture

Gardener on a cherry-picker clipping the hedging at Powis Castle and Garden, Powys, in August.

Gardener on a cherry-picker clipping the hedging at Powis Castle and Garden, Powys, in August. Credit National Trust Images/Arnhel de Serra.

The National Trust has announced plans to step-up its commitment to heritage horticulture with the launch of its new Heritage Gardening Programme.

The programme will for the first time offer comprehensive training for all of the conservation charity’s gardening roles. Continue reading

National Trust appoints specialists to protect Hardwick Hall

The National Trust has appointed landscape architecture specialists Cookson and Tickner to develop a proposal to mitigate HS2’s impact on Hardwick Hall in Derbyshire, and to integrate the high speed rail line into the historic landscape.

An aerial view of Hardwick Hall, Derbyshire. The Hardwick estate is made of of stunning houses and beautiful landscapes.

An aerial view of Hardwick Hall, Derbyshire. Credit National Trust/John Miller. 

The appointment has been made following a competitive tender process conducted on behalf of the National Trust by the Landscape Institute, the Royal Chartered body for landscape architects. Continue reading

Appeal is launched to reinvigorate Winston Churchill’s legacy at his family home and acquire prized possessions for the nation

A £7.1 million appeal has been launched today by the National Trust to reinvigorate the legacy of one of Britain’s greatest statesmen – Sir Winston Churchill – and to acquire hundreds of historic and personal objects that belonged to him at his home, Chartwell in Kent.

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House and collections manager, Katherine Barnett, with some of the objects, including the wooden speech box. Credit National Trust, John Hammond.

It is fifty years since Chartwell, his family home, was opened to the public. The conservation charity is using this anniversary focus to call on its members, supporters, charitable institutions and public bodies to help reach its appeal target and ensure Churchill’s story resonates with future generations.

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Thorneythwaite Farm

The National Trust has acquired approximately 303 acres of land at Thorneythwaite Farm in Borrowdale, in the Lake District, following a successful bid at auction. This beautiful landscape will now be looked after for ever, for everyone.

We are passionate about conserving the beauty and uniqueness of the Lake District. We bid for this land because it offers such amazing places for wildlife including woodland featuring veteran trees, riverside fields, open craggy fell and wood pasture. It’s home to a wealth of important wildlife including redstarts and pied flycatchers.

The land was split into two plots by the auctioneers: the farm land and a farm house. The Trust used its charitable funds to bid for the land rather than the building.

We were aware that there was international interest in the lots, and that it had been marketed widely, so there was risk it could be bought up by a private owner from anywhere in the world, or a property investor. There were certainly no guarantees that a local farmer would have secured it. We simply don’t know who else was in the market for it and what their intentions would have been.

We bid above the guide price but we had an independent valuation which was significantly higher than that. We are confident that we paid the right price to secure this very important stretch of Lakeland landscape. We did not have the funds to buy both lots, the farm house and the land, and for us the land was more of a priority than the farmhouse.

We will continue to farm this land and we believe we can look after it in way which benefits nature, our visitors and the local community. We already manage much of the surrounding land in Borrowdale, which means we can take a ‘big picture’ view of how we look after the wider landscape. That allows us to continue farming and at the same time deliver healthy soil, natural water management, thriving natural habitats and continued public access.

We will also explore how we may be able to use the farm to slow the flow of the Upper River Derwent, thereby contributing to the prevention of flooding downstream in communities such as Keswick and Cockermouth.

The Trust has a long history of and is committed to the tradition of Herdwick farming. We have an existing stock of 21,000 Herdwick sheep and we own 54 farms in the Fells.

The land will be managed by a tenant, and we have already had several expressions of interest. It will be farmed with nature in mind but it will continue to support a flock of Herdwick sheep.