New wave of proposed Marine Conservation Zones don’t go far enough

The Government has today launched a three month consultation on the next tranche of Marine Conservation Zones around the coast of England. Below is a joint response to the announcement from the National Trust and the Marine Conservation Society.

Second round of Marine Conservation Zone designation will leave English waters woefully under protected

Conservation charities say promised network of protection is not even close as vital sites don’t even get to public consultation

The UK’s leading marine charity says it is hugely disappointed that, in the same week the Government has been warned how England’s declining natural environment is harming the economy, it has failed to deliver on promises to better protect English seas.

37 sites had been proposed to go forward to a second public consultation on Marine Conservation Zones (MCZs), all identified by Government’s scientific advisers as vital to plugging “major gaps” that currently exist in the development of a UK network.

However, only 23 sites have made the final list when the consultation for potential new MCZs was launched on Friday 30th January. While MCS is keen that members of the public air their views to ensure that these sites become a reality, the charity has real concerns that English seas will not contribute a network of sites that we can be proud of in future.

Continue reading

National Trust launches new online land map

Huw Davies, Head of Conservation Information for the National Trust, tells us about the launch of a new website, Land Map.

In 1899 the National Trust acquired its first nature reserve with the purchase of two acres of Wicken Fen, near Cambridge. Credit National Trust Images, Robert Morris.

 

There’s a fantastic new online resource for anyone who’s interested in our history – a searchable map called Land Map that shows all the places in our care.

Continue reading

A win for nature: Government announces plans for fracking ban in special places

We are pleased that Government has listened to our recommendations and agreed in principle to rule out some of our most treasured natural and historic landscapes by promising to ban fracking in National Parks, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty and Sites of Special Scientific Interest.

Peter Nixon, National Trust Director for Land, Landscape and Nature, said: “Today’s announced plans by Government to ban fracking in sensitive areas represents a hugely important moment for the natural world and our wonderful landscapes.

“It would be a very dangerous gamble to expose these special places and wildlife that as a nation we love to a largely untested technology that only takes us further away from our climate change targets. We now need to continue to fight for strong regulation to protect our wider environment against the impacts of the shale gas industry.”

Read the Are we Fit to Frack? report, which we launched with Angling Trust, CPRE, RSPB, Salmon and Trout Association, Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust
and Wildlife Trusts, for more on our views.

 

We welcome recommendations to ban fracking in special places

Morecambe Bay in Cumbria is one of many special places for nature that may be affected by the shale gas industry ©National Trust Images/David Noton

Morecambe Bay in Cumbria is one of many special places for nature that may be affected by the shale gas industry ©National Trust Images/David Noton

The National Trust welcomes today’s recommendations by the Environmental Audit Committee to ban fracking in protected and nationally significant landscapes.

Continue reading

New partnership calls for better ‘Landscapes for Everyone’

The National Trust has joined forces with charities across the UK this week to call for the protection and celebration of Britain’s treasured landscapes.

With ongoing speculative development in and around sensitive areas, such as National Parks and AONBs, the group of 27 organisations believes that it is vital for future government policy and funding to reflect the extraordinary value of landscapes.

Common heather, Bell heather and Western gorse lining the coastal path on the Great Hangman with the Little Hangman, Devon

Common heather, Bell heather and Western gorse lining the coastal path on the Great Hangman with the Little Hangman, Devon. National Trust Images/David Noton

Continue reading

Record number of National Trust places star in TV’s Wolf Hall

Adapted for the BBC from the award-winning novels by Hilary Mantel, Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies chart the meteoric rise of Thomas Cromwell in the Tudor court, from his lowly start as a blacksmith’s son to Henry VIII’s closest advisor.

Wolf Hall Montacute credit Giles Keyte Ed Miller (10)

Filming for the six-part drama took place entirely on location in the UK this summer, with six National Trust places in the South West taking centre stage.

Continue reading

Mount Stewart reunited with its historic demesne

Mount Stewart’s world famous house and gardens are set to be reunited with their historic demesne after more than 50 years.

The news comes as the National Trust today announced plans which will see the area which the conservation charity looks after increase from 100 to 1000 acres. Continue reading