Formby celebrates 50 years in National Trust care

Rangers, volunteers and campaigners have celebrated 50 years of conservation at Formby.

The mile-long stretch of dunes and pinewoods on the Sefton coast was acquired by the National Trust in 1967, following a £20,000 fundraising appeal.

Father and children on the beach at Formby, Liverpool

Family on Formby beach. (c) Chris Lacey/National Trust Images

Continue reading

Advertisements

Bantham Beach & Avon Estuary

Mark Harold, South West Regional Director for the National Trust said: ‘Today (3 July 2014) we have been informed by the agents acting on behalf of Evan’s Estates that we have been unsuccessful in our bid to purchase Bantham Beach and Avon Estuary in South Devon.

‘We are extremely disappointed at this decision.  We, along with many thousands of people who have contacted us over the past few weeks encouraging our involvement in its future, care very passionately about Bantham.  We believe this is a very special place, held dear in the hearts of many, not only locally, but also those who have fond memories of childhoods and family times spent there.

‘We will of course continue to care and protect for ever and for everyone the 40 miles and 3,000 hectares of the South Devon coast we already care for. We would also want, if possible, to work with any future owners of Bantham Beach & Estuary and ensure that this beautiful location is continued to be enjoyed by the many thousands of people who have told us how much it means to them.

‘We would like to thank everyone for their support of our fundraising appeal. As a charity the Trust relies on the generous support of its supporters who help us care for some of the most beautiful and vulnerable stretches of coastal land in the country.’

Volunteers help Formby clean up its act

This April, National Trust rangers at Formby beach near Liverpool welcomed a team of volunteers to help with their Big Beach Clean.

Rubbish colleceted during the Big Beach Clean, Credit Kate Martin

The clean-up operation, organised by the Marine Conservation Society, attracted some 90 volunteers who collected a staggering 2,075 discarded items of litter. The selection of rubbish weighed in at over 340 kg and even included a rusty watering can and a large bakery crate.

Continue reading