Andrew Logan sculpture comes to Buckland Abbey, former home of Sir Francis Drake

‘The Art of Reflection’ from 1 July 2017

An exhibition of contemporary art by the renowned sculptor Andrew Logan will open on Saturday 1 July at the National Trust’s Buckland Abbey in Devon.

‘The Art of Reflection’ interprets the history and spirit of the abbey in 18 Logan sculptures, placed in 13 selected locations throughout the house and gardens, including the Great Barn, Kitchen Garden and the historic Cart Pond.

The exhibition, one of the largest ever staged by the National Trust in collaboration with one artist, is curated jointly by Buckland Abbey and Andrew Logan, with work selected from five decades of the artist’s career.

A major attraction will be Andrew Logan’s new jewel and painted glass portrait of Sir Francis Drake, Buckland’s most celebrated owner.

Drake’s Portrait 2017, photo Steve Haywood/National Trust

‘The Art of Reflection’ has been organised under the conservation charity’s              Trust New Art contemporary art programme.

Reflecting themes ranging from exploration and discovery, to peace and tranquillity, and nature and the universe, ‘The Art of Reflection’ includes ‘Goldfield’, one of Logan’s earliest public commissions from 1976.

The giant installation will fill Buckland’s Great Barn with 4.5-metre high wheat stalks, field mice and floating butterflies.

Other exhibition highlights include ‘World of Smiles’, a hanging globe in Drake’s Chamber, echoing his circumnavigation of the world, and ‘Life and Oomph’, Logan’s life-size sculpture featuring Royal Ballet principal ballerina Lynn Seymour, reaching out from a sea of pearls. Never previously exhibited, ‘Life and Oomph’ will be installed in the former Long Gallery, a space historically used at Buckland for recreation and dancing.

Goldfield, photo Steve Haywood/National Trust

 

The abbey’s dining room is to be transformed by Logan into an installation titled ‘Dinner with Andrew Logan and Friends’ featuring artworks by his friends Duggie Fields, Jennifer and Christine Binnie, Richard Logan and Dame Zandra Rhodes.

Buckland’s gardens will be home to Logan’s ‘Four Flowers of the Apocalypse’, a floral tribute to the abbey’s spectacular natural setting, and ‘Excalibur’, a 3-metre glass sword rising out of the abbey’s Cart Pond.

‘The Alternative Miss World’ event which Logan conceived and has run for over 40 years will be represented by the ornamental ‘Elements’ and ‘Universe’ thrones on which the competition’s winners have been crowned. During the exhibition, Buckland’s visitors will be able to try out the thrones for themselves in the Great Hall which has welcomed many famous noblemen and dignitaries during its colourful history.

Buckland’s volunteers will be given specially created pieces of ‘apple’ jewellery to wear in celebration of the abbey’s 700 year old history of apple-growing and cider-making. Other pieces from Logan’s Heritage Jewellery collection will be displayed alongside historic artefacts in the abbey’s collection.

Excalibur, photo Steve Haywood/National Trust

James Breslin, Buckland Abbey’s House & Visitor Experience Manager said: “We’re thrilled to be working with an artist of Andrew’s calibre and to bring his work to Buckland. We have designed the exhibition with Andrew to weave its way through our existing collection and historic spaces, offering new and exciting ways to reflect on Buckland’s past through contemporary art.

“We hope our visitors will be surprised, inspired, and perhaps even challenged, by discovering Andrew’s beautiful sculptures in the tranquil and unique setting of Buckland.”

Andrew Logan said: “It is a joy working with Buckland Abbey for this exhibition and drawing inspiration from its great beauty, peace and tranquillity, resting in the Devon hills. It is exciting to mix new and old work, to see ‘Goldfield’ going on show again after 41 years, while creating a portrait of Francis Drake especially for Buckland as a homage to him. I really hope the exhibition is going to enthral visitors and be like Alice in Wonderland…full of surprises.”

Grace Davies, National Trust Contemporary Art Programme Manager said:
“For over five years visitors have been coming to experience Trust New Art, our rich and diverse programme of contemporary arts at properties across the country inspired by National Trust places. Continuing the spirit of Trust New Art, this vibrant exhibition by Andrew Logan shines a new light on Buckland Abbey, giving visitors the opportunity to experience contemporary creativity that is rooted in our unique heritage.”

‘The Art of Reflection’ runs until  February 2018.

Two thousand ticking clocks form art installation at Nostell to celebrate one of England’s greatest inventors

From Saturday 25 March, the last day of Greenwich Meridian Time before the clocks spring forward an hour, visitors to the National Trust’s Nostell in Yorkshire will be able to see – and hear – an extraordinary art installation celebrating one of England’s greatest inventors, John Harrison.

Harrison’s Garden by internationally renowned artist Luke Jerram has been inspired by clockmaker Harrison, who created the marine chronometer and was born at Nostell in 1693, the son of the estate carpenter.

The exhibition is a display of 2,000 working clocks that will take over an entire room on the ground floor of the 18th-century house from 25 March – 9 July. In a fitting celebration of this local boy, Harrison’s Garden includes 500 clocks that have been donated by Nostell’s community, its staff and volunteers to add to those gathered by the artist.

Harrison’s Garden by Luke Jerram, credit National Trust/Simon Dewhurst

With no formal education, Harrison spent his earlier years crafting clocks entirely from wood and Nostell is home to one of his only three surviving early wooden longcase clocks, created 300 years ago in 1717.

This significant piece of horological history is at the heart of a second exhibition, The Clock Stops, which opens alongside Harrison’s Garden at Nostell. Visitors will be able to view the original clock up-close, alongside a specially commissioned film about the clockmaker and a series of displays which celebrate his work.

Chris Blackburn, project curator said: “At Nostell we celebrate the work of ordinary people crafting the extraordinary. We’re very proud to look after one of John Harrison’s early handmade wooden clocks and we’re looking forward to telling his story through this fascinating contemporary installation.”

The clocks in Harrison’s Garden are clustered to form patterns and shapes along the floors and surfaces, with each one set to a different time so that visitors will hear a musical delight of ticking, clicking and chiming throughout the day.

John Harrison, credit National Trust/Simon Dewhurst

Just as Harrison’s creativity started to tick at Nostell and developed over his lifetime, the contemporary installation will grow in size as it tours three other National Trust places across the country from 2017 – 2018.

Following its debut at Nostell between March and July, Harrison’s Garden is set to appear at Castle Drogo in Devon, Gunby Hall in Lincolnshire and Penrhyn Castle in Wales, with each place asking their local communities to donate 500 additional clocks to this growing installation. Jerram, a creator of sculptures, installations and live arts projects across the globe, is excited to see Harrison’s Garden expand in size and sound as it spreads into these historic spaces.

Luke said: “For me, Harrison’s Garden is an imagined landscape; a garden of clocks. It is a glimpse of a surreal fictional world or perhaps an image from one of John Harrison’s dreams. Like a garden, the installation is a living and growing collection of different clock ‘species’.”

The clock at Nostell that was created 300 years ago by John Harrison, credit National Trust/Simon Dewhurst

 

The touring installation is a Trust New Art project, a programme that enriches experiences for regular visitors and attracts new audiences who may not have the opportunity to encounter world-class contemporary art where they live.

Grace Davies, the National Trust’s Contemporary Arts Programme Manager said: “We are very pleased not only to host, but also grow Harrison’s Garden, which will be a remarkable feast for the eyes and the ears, and so fitting to the birthplace of John Harrison, reminding us both literally and metaphorically of the passage of time. It is part of a season of inspirational work by artists that shines a new light on the places we look after, giving fresh perspectives that remain rooted in our rich and varied heritage.”