Wildlife on the Great Orme

Matthew Oates, National Specialist on Nature and Wildlife for the National Trust, shares his love for the Great Orme in North Wales and the wildlife that calls it home.

The Great Orme is a place of pilgrimage for British naturalists.  Try finding a botanist or a butterfly enthusiast who hasn’t been there, or at least one who doesn’t desperately want to visit.  It is also on the birders’ radar, for its increasing Chough population and because it is a place where rare migrants turn up.  Bat, beetle, lichen, moss, moth and marine wildlife enthusiasts also know and love the Great Orme, as do geologists, geographers and archaeologists. In effect, it is a wildlife paradise.

The Great Orme, 12/05/15. Photograph Richard Williams richardwilliamsimages@hotmail.com 07901518159

The Great Orme, Credit National Trust, Richard Williams

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Original Irish Yew creates Sea Monster at Mount Stewart

A new Celtic figure sculpted from yew will welcome visitors to the world famous Mount Stewart gardens on the shores of Strangford Lough in County Down, Northern Ireland.

l-r Neil Porteous, National Trust Head of Gardens and Alan Ryder, Mount Stewart Propagator with the new Formorian. Credit Elaine Hill

l-r Neil Porteous, National Trust Head of Gardens and Alan Ryder, Mount Stewart Propagator with the new Formorian. Credit Elaine Hill

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South American super-nannies welcome new arrivals

Nannies for the new arrival might be on one famous couple’s minds, but nervous mothers in one part of North Wales are resting easier thanks to their two male super-nannies from South America.

An Alpaca to watch over ewe. Credit Wynn Owen

An Alpaca to watch over ewe. Credit Wynn Owen

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Clandon Park fire – items rescued from Speakers’ Parlour

One of Clandon Park’s most important rooms has miraculously survived almost intact after the devastating fire left the 18th century mansion a burnt out shell last week (Wednesday 29 April).

While the building is being assessed for structural damage, only limited access has been granted to the least damaged parts of the house.

Among these is the Speakers’ Parlour, one of the ground floor rooms, which celebrated the three members of the Onslow family who were Speakers for the House of Commons over the centuries.

The Speakers’ Parlour remained almost intact after the fire which has enabled access to the collections that remained inside.

Removing the carpet from the Speakers' Parlour after the fire

Removing the carpet from the Speakers’ Parlour after the fire

Objects now taken to safety include the ornate ormolu chandelier which was part of the decorative scheme from 1801, the large Turkey carpet dating from the 19th century, the decorative polished brass and steel fender from the fireplace and pieces of delicate, gilt etched glassware.

The decorative plaster ceiling in the Speakers’ Parlour, among the most magnificent in the house, has been carefully propped up to protect it, and the chimneypiece, designed by the house’s architect Giacomo Leoni in the 1720s, has also survived.

All the paintings from the room, including the portraits of Arthur Onslow, the Great Speaker, and Richard Onslow, Speaker in the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, were rescued on the day of the fire.

The Speakers' Parlour at Clandon Park, Surrey.

The Speakers’ Parlour before the fire, photo: National Trust Images/Nadia Mackenzie

 

Jim Foy who is managing the salvage operation at Clandon comments: “It is heartening that we have been able to rescue more of the important items inside the house and we hope that there will be more good news as the salvage operation continues.

 “We are still limited in terms of access while structural engineers assess the building. The weather is also a big factor as we wait to see how the building responds to conditions like the high winds we have had over the past couple of days. We are incredibly grateful for the continued support we are receiving from volunteers, external specialists, the fire service and many others.”

An investigation is underway to identify the cause of the fire.

It is too early to say what the longer term plans will be for Clandon Park but donations raised will help it to face its uncertain future. To make a donation please call 0344 800 1895 or donate online at www.nationaltrust.org.uk/donate

Head for the hills – are ewe the right person for this one-off shepherding opportunity?

The National Trust is looking for a second shepherd to support an innovative conservation project in the foothills of Snowdon in North Wales.

Herding the sheep on the mountains above Hafod Y Llan. Credit Joe Cornish

Herding the sheep on the mountains above Hafod Y Llan. Credit Joe Cornish

The conservation charity’s in-hand farm, Hafod-y-Llan, manages 1600 Welsh Mountain sheep and every day between May and September, some of the flock is shepherded to new grazing areas away from any sensitive mountain habitats such as upland heaths and flushes (wet, boggy areas), in a bid to improve plant diversity on areas of the mountain.

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National Trust’s first garden centre opens

The National Trust’s first garden centre at Morden Hall Park will officially open on Saturday 9 May.

The 5,000 square metre garden centre is the only outlet in the UK to be completely peat free, selling a range of plants and shrubs in line with the conservation charity’s principles.

The National Trust's new garden centre at Morden Hall Park in South London.  Credit Sophia Schorr-Kon

The National Trust’s new garden centre at Morden Hall Park in South London. Credit Sophia Schorr-Kon

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Marine Conservation Zones – Tranche 2

Lundy Island

The waters around Lundy Island became England’s first Marine Conservation Zone in 2010.

 

Here is the National Trust’s response to the Government’s consultation on designating 23 new Marine Conservation Zones off the English coast: MCZ 2nd tranche Consultation NT response

The Trust is calling for the designation of all 23 candidates MCZs.

If you would like to submit your own response to the consultation, you can do so using this handy template provided by the Marine Conservation Society:  http://www.mcsuk.org/mpa/consultation

But hurry, the consultation closes on Friday!